EFSA: caffeine for sports ok, but not for weight loss

The 8 of April 2011 EFSA’s NDA Panel has published the outcome of the evaluations of a fourth series of ‘general function’ health claims proposed for use on food products.

Only few opinions are positive for sports nutrition. Among these 442 health claims, the most relevant are related to caffeine; in particular  health claims such as ‘Increased alertness’ , ‘ increased attention’, ‘increase in endurance performance’, ‘increase in endurance capacity’, ‘reduction in the rated perceived exertion/effort during exercise’ are now accepted for caffeine. Other positive outcomes are related to resistant maltodextrins ( ‘Changes in bowel function’), Choline (‘ Contribution to normal lipid metabolism ‘) and olive poliphenols  ( ‘Hydroxytyrosol protects LDL particles from oxidative damage’).

Instead most EFSA opinions are negative. It should be noted that all the health claims on ‘reduction of body weight’ related to caffeine and green tea have been rejected. Other negative outcomes are related to several aminoacids such as  L-Arginine, Lysine, Tryptophan and aminoacidic derivatives such as Taurine and Carnosine, particularly interesting are the rejected health claims concerning  ‘management of body mass’  and “improvement of endothelium-dependent vasodilation’ (Arginine),  ‘Contribution to normal protein synthesis’ (Lysine), ‘Maintenance of normal muscle function’ (Taurin). Also Quercetin, Lutein, Alpha Linoleic Acid (ALA), FOS and PUFAs DHA/EPA (Omega 3) received general negative opinions from the Panel.

“The positive opinion on caffeine is important specifically for the benefits which EFSA has recognized within the domain of the Nutrition and Health Claims Regulation, and the standard that it sets.” commented Luca Bucchini, managing director of Hylobates “Though EFSA’s opinions are important when thinking to new products, they should not be the only driving force. EFSA’s processs is welcome when compared to the less than transparent situation in several EU countries; at the same time, it should be noted that EFSA’s approach has been less than consistent between micronutrients and other substances. It is time for the sports nutrition industry to think carefully about the future.”

– Armand and Jacopo, Sport Nutrition Team –

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One Response to EFSA: caffeine for sports ok, but not for weight loss

  1. Pingback: Low glycaemic “properties” claims: EFSA brings new hope « Hylobates – food, science and regulation

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