Low glycaemic “properties” claims: EFSA brings new hope

Low glycemic “properties” are an industry’s favorite when it comes to sports nutrition, particularly for bars. Though such claims are rather carelessly used in some EU countries, with little official scrutiny, there was concern that claims such as those would not be allowed under Reg. 1924/2006 or would fall outside its scope and hence in a limbo of regulatory uncertainty.

Although the recent batch of EFSA opinions on health claims resulted in several sadly negative opinions, sugar replacers such as xylitol, sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol, lactitol, isomalt, erythritol, D-tagatose, isomaltulose, sucralose and polydextrose came out as clear winners. EFSA’s NDA panel declared that “a cause and effect relationship has been established between the consumption of foods/drinks containing xylitol, sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol, lactitol, isomalt, erythritol, D-tagatose, isomaltulose, sucralose or polydextrose instead of sugar and reduction in post-prandial blood glucose responses (without disproportionally increasing post-prandial insulinaemic responses) as compared to sugar-containing foods/drinks“.

The Panel was apparently convinced that the Regulation’s restrictions on comparative claims as well as art. 3 (“...the use of nutrition and health claims shall not….give rise to doubt about the safety and/or the nutritional adequacy of other foods“, with sugar possibly the loser in this case) did not present a problem, although this may come back at the enforcement level in Member States.

In practice, while the immediate implications of this EFSA opinion vary in different Member States, there is a clear possibility of making “low glycemic” claims on food supplements (e.g., protein with sucralose) and bars with polyols (news which will make many happy).

However, the conditions set by the Panel deserve a careful analysis before using the claims.

– Sports Nutrition Team –

NB: Stevia, which, at the moment, is not allowed anyway, is not in the list.

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